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dc.contributor.authorChandler, Amy
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-20T13:56:45Z
dc.date.available2015-05-20T13:56:45Z
dc.date.issued2014-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/10422
dc.descriptionResearch project was funded by the Sir Halley Stewart Trust Funden
dc.description.abstractThis briefing presents a summary of a qualitative research project which explored how self-harm was understood by a diverse group of 122 young people, mostly aged 13-16 years. 1 in 10 of those aged 14-16 report self-harm at some point in their life (O'Connor et al., 2009) and it is likely that the actual numbers of people who have self harmed in this age group is higher. Despite this, most qualitative research about self-harm and young people has focused on those aged 16 and over. This means that much of what is said about young people and self-harm is based on research with older people, or on the views of professionals who work with under-16s.en
dc.contributor.sponsorThe SASH (Social Aspects of Self-Harm, including drug and alcohol use)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCRFRen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBriefing 74en
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectYoung peopleen
dc.subjectSelf-harmen
dc.subjectDrugs and alcoholen
dc.subjectFamilies and relationshipsen
dc.titleA sign that something is wrong?: Young people talking about self-harmen
dc.typeArticleen


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