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dc.contributor.authorClark, Andy
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-28T17:05:29Z
dc.date.available2006-06-28T17:05:29Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citation"Making Moral Space: A Reply To Churchland" in R. Campbell and B. Hunter (eds) Moral Epistemology Naturalized: Canadian Journal Of Philosophy Supp. Volume 26 (2000) (University of Calgary Press, Alberta, Canada) p.307-312en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1324
dc.description.abstractLike those famous nations divided by a single tongue, my paper (this volume) and Professor P.M. Churchland's deep and engaging reply offer different spins on a common heritage. The common heritage is, of course, a connectionist vision of the inner neural economy- a vision which depicts that economy in terms of supra-sentential state spaces, vector-to-vector transformations, and the kinds of skillful pattern-recognition routine we share with the bulk of terrestrial intelligent life-forms. That which divides us is, as ever, much harder to isolate and name. Clearly, it has something to do with the role of moral talk and exchange, and something to do with the conception of morality itself (and, correlatively, with the conception of moral progress). Most of this Reply will be devoted to clarifying the nature of the disputed territory. First, though (as a prophylactic against misunderstanding) I shall rehearse some points of agreement concerning moral talk and progress.en
dc.format.extent24479 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Calgary Pressen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.titleMaking Moral Space: A Reply To Churchlanden
dc.typeArticleen


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