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dc.contributor.authorGlynn, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-11T15:48:21Z
dc.date.available2006-08-11T15:48:21Z
dc.date.issued2006-08
dc.identifier.citationSarah Glynn (2006) Marxism and Multiculturalism, online papers archived by the Institute of Geography, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1398
dc.description.abstractMost current debate on multiculturalism revolves around fundamental conflicts within liberalism. The liberal hegemony has meant that the intense and detailed debates that accompanied the evolution of Marxist social democracy have been relegated to the historical margins. There is an irony here as multicultural theory itself originally grew out of developments within Marxism – developments that began as criticisms of emphasis but ended up rejecting fundamental Marxist principles. The Marxist debate starts from a very different perspective. Its focus is not the individual, but society as a whole. The contention of this paper is that a reexamination of these debates and of their historical interpretations can throw a new light on issues today. An evolutionary history of the ideas will be accompanied by an examination of how they were enacted in a geographical context that is continuing to make multicultural history: London’s East End.en
dc.format.extent1487371 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInstitute of Geography. The School of Geosciences.The University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInstitute of Geography Online Paper Series;GEO-019
dc.subjectMulticulturalismen
dc.subjectEast Enden
dc.subjectBengalisen
dc.subjectJewsen
dc.subjectMarxismen
dc.subjectInstitute of Geography Online Papers Series (2005-2008)en
dc.titleMarxism and Multiculturalism.en
dc.typePreprinten


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