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dc.contributor.authorClark, Andy
dc.contributor.author
dc.coverage.spatial24en
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-10T11:13:18Z
dc.date.available2006-10-10T11:13:18Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citation"Cognitive Complexity and the Sensorimotor Frontier" for Joint Session of Mind and the Aristotelian Society, 2006, and to appear in the Proceedings of the 2006 Joint Sessionen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1448
dc.description.abstractWhat is the relation between perceptual experience and the suite of sensorimotor skills that enable us to act in the very world we perceive? The relation, according to ‘sensorimotor models’ (O’Regan and Noe¨ 2001, Noe¨ 2004) is tight indeed. Perceptual experience, on these accounts, is enacted via skilled sensorimotor activity, and gains its content and character courtesy of our knowledge of the relations between (typically) movement and sensory stimulation. I shall argue that this formulation is too extreme, and that it fails to accommodate the substantial firewalls, dis-integrations, and specialpurpose streamings that form the massed strata of human cognition. In particular, such strong sensorimotor models threaten to obscure the computationally potent insensitivity of key information-processing events to the full subtleties of embodied cycles of sensing and moving.en
dc.format.extent129143 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Aristotelian Society and The Mind Associationen
dc.subjectsensorimotoren
dc.titleCognitive Complexity and the Sensorimotor Frontieren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typeConference Paperen


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