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dc.contributor.authorBroer, Tineke
dc.contributor.authorCunningham-Burley, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorDeary, Ian
dc.contributor.authorPickersgill, Martyn
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T11:25:16Z
dc.date.available2016-03-08T11:25:16Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/15736
dc.description.abstractBackground: Research on the brain is increasingly drawn upon in policy-making and family services, with consequences for parenting advice and parenting practices. Especially in the early years of children's lives, infant brains are said to grow rapidly, and this option has informed policies around parent and service for parents.en
dc.contributor.sponsorSupported by The Leverhulme Trusten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCRFRen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNeoroscience Briefing 2016en
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectChildren and infantsen
dc.subjectFamily servicesen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectSocial policyen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectEarly yearsen
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen
dc.titleNeuroscience, Policy and Family Lifeen
dc.typeArticleen


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Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International