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dc.contributor.authorMullen, Josephen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-06T10:30:35Z
dc.date.available2016-12-06T10:30:35Z
dc.date.issued1978en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/18479
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the way in which two exogenous institutions, Church and State, have influenced both the development and the underdevelopment of Uwanda, a remote area of South Western Tanzania. It is concerned with the strategies and policies of both of these institutions as applied in concreto, and the responses of, and the initiatives taken, by the anda people to resist these alien incursions. As such, it is an empirical micro-study of the politics of interaction and confrontation between the rural masses, the colonial administration and the Catholic mission of Uwanda. It exposes the mechanisms employed to subject a population to alien domination, and the alliances of convenience between the mission and the colonial authorities intended to impose mutually beneficial political and cultural hegemony. The impact of these policies is related to the impoverishment and backwardness of the area, labour migrancy, the decline of local crafts, the seizure of negotiable assets and the increased vulnerability to drought and natural disasters.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2016 Block 5en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleChurch and state in the development of Uwanda. Tanzania. 1894-1915en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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