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dc.contributor.authorLaurie, Langworthyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-19T14:06:09Z
dc.date.available2016-12-19T14:06:09Z
dc.date.issued1907
dc.date.submitted
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/19035
dc.description.abstractPrior to 1889 there had not been a serious epidemic of influenza for over forty years; the result was that in that year the majority of medical practitioners had no practical knowledge of the clinical aspects of the disease, and what was known as influenza was really a feverish catarrh, or common cold in the head. Since the pandemic of 1889-90, the disease has practically always been present, occasionally breaking out. into epidemic form in the colder months of the year; so that, in general practice, many cases are met with, and one has every opportunity of studying the various aspects of the disease; although it is no doubt true that many of the attacks which are now in a loose way diagnosed as influenza, are something else. Influenza is, however, a disease in which the symptoms are so varying, and the complications so numerous and so grave, that a thorough understanding of the subject is very necessary.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2016 Block 6en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleInfluenzaen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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