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dc.contributor.authorScaltsas, Dory
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-30T15:05:58Z
dc.date.available2007-08-30T15:05:58Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1963
dc.descriptionForthcoming in the Blackwell Companion to Aristotle, 2008en
dc.description.abstractAll bodies in the sublunary word are composed of mixtures of all the primary elements – fire, air, earth, and water. Aristotle argues for the primacy of these four elements in the constitution of objects in our word. He further develops an original theory of mixing of elements to explain the formation of uniform matter such as granite, flesh, or oil. His theory of mixing of elements has received much attention in the past decade, resulting in an exciting array of interpretations that have also generated contributions to contemporary philosophy. In what follows I offer an account of Aristotle’s theory of elements and their mixtures, and survey the main alternative readings of his position.en
dc.format.extent129538 bytes
dc.format.extent114688 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectAristotleen
dc.titleMixing the Elementsen
dc.typeBook Chapteren


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