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dc.contributor.advisorDeary, Ian
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-10T09:35:17Z
dc.date.available2007-09-10T09:35:17Z
dc.date.issued2007-11-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/1981
dc.description.abstractThe simplicity principle suggests that the brain minimises noise when perceiving a novel situation. In this paper we discuss whether this process could be considered as an intelligent cognitive process. Method: 62 Participants were recruited and submitted to a series of psychometric intelligence evaluations, as well as a novel simplicity test, personality questionnaire Results. There were no significant correlations between simplicity task performance and psychometric intelligence. Nor did personality play a significant role in this approach There were however, significant differences in the performance between those who approached the problem intuitively and those who attempted to ‘problem solve’. The simplicity principle may be based on a ‘primal’ cognitive reflex, and therefore have no significant correlation with general intelligence. Further research is required to explore this possibility furtheren
dc.format.extent3530752 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectsimplicityen
dc.subjectgeneral intelligenceen
dc.titlePsychometric Intelligence and efficiency of categorisation using the simplicity model. Is there a potential cognitive correlation?en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc(R) Master of Science by Researchen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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