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dc.contributor.authorDay, Troy
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorRead, Andrew F
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-05T16:02:28Z
dc.date.available2007-11-05T16:02:28Z
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifier.citationProc. R. Soc. B (2007) 274, 2685–2692en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2007.0809
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/2086
dc.descriptionThis article is (c) 2007 The Royal Societyen
dc.description.abstractThe trade-off hypothesis of virulence evolution rests on the assumption that infection-induced mortality is a consequence of host exploitation by parasites. This hypothesis lies at the heart of many empirical and theoretical studies of virulence evolution, despite growing evidence that infection-induced mortality is very often a by-product of host immune responses. We extend the theoretical framework of the trade-off hypothesis to incorporate such immunopathology and explore how this detrimental aspect of host defence mechanisms affects the evolution of pathogen exploitation and hence infection-induced mortality. We argue that there are qualitatively different ways in which immunopathology can arise and suggest ways in which empirical studies can tease apart these effects. We show that immunopathology can cause infection- induced mortality to increase or decrease as a result of pathogen evolution, depending on how it covaries with pathogen exploitation strategies and with parasite killing by hosts. Immunopathology is thus an important determinant of whether public and animal health programmes will drive evolution in a clinically beneficial or detrimental direction. Immunopathology complicates our understanding of disease evolution, but can nevertheless be readily accounted for within the framework of the trade-off hypothesis.en
dc.format.extent162049 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen
dc.subjectimmunopathologyen
dc.subjectecological immunologyen
dc.subjectpathogenicityen
dc.subjectbiological sciencesen
dc.titleEvolution of parasite virulence when host responses cause diseaseen
dc.typeArticleen


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