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dc.contributor.authorRåberg, Lars
dc.contributor.authorSim, Derek
dc.contributor.authorRead, Andrew F
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-21T09:45:34Z
dc.date.available2008-02-21T09:45:34Z
dc.date.issued2007-11
dc.identifier.citationScience 2 November 2007: Vol. 318. no. 5851, pp. 812 - 814en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/2140
dc.description.abstractHosts can in principle employ two different strategies to defend themselves against parasites: resistance and tolerance. Animals typically exhibit considerable genetic variation for resistance (the ability to limit parasite burden). However, little is known about whether animals can evolve tolerance (the ability to limit the damage caused by a given parasite burden). Using rodent malaria in laboratory mice as a model system and the statistical framework developed by plant-pathogen biologists, we demonstrated genetic variation for tolerance, as measured by the extent to which anemia and weight loss increased with increasing parasite burden. Moreover, resistance and tolerance were negatively genetically correlated. These results mean that animals, like plants, can evolve two conceptually different types of defense, a finding that has important implications for the understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of infectious diseases.en
dc.format.extent536724 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Scienceen
dc.subjectimmunology researchen
dc.titleDisentangling Genetic Variation for Resistance and Tolerance to Infectious Diseases in Animalsen
dc.typeArticleen


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