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dc.contributor.advisorDenvir, Martinen
dc.contributor.advisorPrendergast, Bernarden
dc.contributor.advisorMyerson, Saulen
dc.contributor.authord'Arcy, Joanna Louiseen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-09T11:39:51Z
dc.date.available2017-11-09T11:39:51Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/25476
dc.description.abstractSince living conditions have improved and antibiotics have entered routine use, valvular heart disease (VHD) in the developed world is mostly degenerative in origin, rather than rheumatic. Our population is increasing with age, and therefore the burden of VHD is likely to increase. Despite this, the epidemiology & prognostication in VHD remain poorly understood. A better understanding of the prevalence of VHD in our population, and improved methods of predicting outcomes, are essential if we are to be better equipped to meet the challenges of this new “epidemic”. This thesis aims to improve our knowledge of the prevalence of VHD in the elderly, and the potential benefits of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) assessment of patients with clinically significant mitral regurgitation. The prevalence of undiagnosed valvular heart disease in those aged 65 and over is examined in Chapters 2 and 3. Chapter 2 outlines a population-based screening study for VHD in primary care in Oxfordshire, which the author played a central role in establishing. The results show that VHD is extremely common in this cohort, and is strongly associated with increasing age. In chapter 4, the level of anxiety provoked by screening for VHD is looked at; this demonstrates that only a small number of patients have significant anxiety levels, but it is more likely in those with a new diagnosis of VHD, and in women. From Chapter 5 onwards, the thesis focuses on the use of CMR in patients with significant mitral regurgitation (MR). In Chapter 5, the clinical value of quantitative assessment of MR using CMR is examined, showing that it was able to predict progression to symptoms or surgery in these patients. In conclusion, this thesis offers insights into the prevalence of VHD in the elderly population, and looks at the anxiety associated with looking for VHD in this group. The potential clinical benefits of CMR in patients with MR are examined, and quantification of MR with this modality would appear to be of prognostic utility.en
dc.contributor.sponsorotheren
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversiond'Arcy JL, Prendergast BD, Chambers JB, Ray SG, Bridgewater B. Valvular heart disease: the next cardiac epidemic. Heart. 2011;97(2):91-3.en
dc.relation.hasversionMyerson SG, d'Arcy J, Mohiaddin R, Greenwood JP, Karamitsos TD, Francis JM, et al. Aortic regurgitation quantification using cardiovascular magnetic resonance: association with clinical outcome. Circulation. 2012;126(12):1452-60.en
dc.relation.hasversionMyerson SG, d'Arcy J, Christiansen JP, Dobson LE, Mohiaddin R, Francis JM, et al. Determination of Clinical Outcome in Mitral Regurgitation With Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Quantitation. Circulation. 2016.en
dc.subjectvalvular heart diseaseen
dc.subjectVHDen
dc.subjectmitral regurgitationen
dc.subjectcardiac magnetic resonanceen
dc.titleValvular heart disease: novel epidemiological and imaging studiesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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