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dc.contributor.advisorVigentini, Lorenzo
dc.contributor.authorChamberlin, Hattie
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-12T14:49:03Z
dc.date.available2008-11-12T14:49:03Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/2560
dc.description.abstractThe possessions people value most say a great deal about the kind of person they are. This study examines the differences between gender and their most valued possessions, and the relationship between consumption patterns and personal identity. The salient results and suggestions for further research emphasize the relevance of the findings of this study, and the possible areas that could be expanded on in future research. The reasons for which people value their most treasured possessions were found to indicate that women were more likely to value things which enhanced their appearance or symbolised close personal relationships. Men tend to value things related to a recreational passion, or objects which are of a practical nature. It also emerged that there was a relationship between people’s personal identity and spending money in areas of consumption which nurtured those particular identity factors.en
dc.format.extent262590 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectpsychologyen
dc.title“Are you what you have? Investigating the link between consumption, possessions and identity”.en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelUndergraduateen
dc.type.qualificationnameUndergraduateen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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