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dc.contributor.authorWitiuk, Sidney Wayneen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:14:49Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:14:49Z
dc.date.issued1990en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/26058
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation documents the districting requirements for collection units for taking the Canadian Census and provides a spatial decision support system for their automatic creation. In the context of the literature on autodistricting, this problem falls under the general category of creating districts for monitoring, surveillance and inventory applications since the Census is essentially an spatial inventory exercise. The basic requirement is to create an area-based categorical coverage such that the workload is equitably distributed amongst Census Representatives within the limits of a large number of constraints and conditions.en
dc.description.abstractA new omnibus automated districting process that combines a 3-stage cascading selection procedure for identifying sub-blockface, blockface and block level collection units with a 4- stage heuristic solution procedure for grouping blocks (termed 'assigns', 'annexes', 're-assigns' and 'adjusts') is contributed by this research to provide a systematic response to varying districting situations.en
dc.description.abstractThe resulting spatial decision support system for autodistricting has been tested on test data sets and on one of the larger urban population centres of Canada. The set of test pattern sites mimicking typical settlement patterns was generated to ensure that the various alternative assignment or block grouping methods (i.e., unidirectional and bidirectional tessellations based on circular and rectangular grids and regular, random and 'extrema-based' seeds) performed as designed and specified. The Census Subdivision of Laval (in the Census Metropolitan Area of Montreal) was selected as the test site for comparing the performance of the autodistricting capacity to the actual, manually created, results from the 1986 Census.en
dc.description.abstractTo permit the comparison of results from classical manual and automated processes, a set of satisficing evaluation functions that vary in accordance with data availability was implemented in the context of a competing set of districting objectives. The most sophisticated of these evaluation functions incorporates a composite index that combines the distribution and a measure of the 'density' of the dwellings with the length of the route that must be followed to complete the collection activity (including travel time to the start of the route and between route parts).en
dc.description.abstractTo assess the continued acceptability of the districting from the previous Census, and/or to select between alternative results generated by computer-assisted approaches, a set of objective functions is provided that vary depending upon the available amount of geographic, cartographic or statistical data.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 15en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleA spatial decision support system for autodistricting collection units for the taking of the Canadian censusen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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