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dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Thomasen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:15:35Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:15:35Z
dc.date.issued1937
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/26111
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIn this investigation, thirty boys and girls in the middle senior class of an Edinburgh elementary school were examined in:en
dc.description.abstractI. (a) Upper limit of tonal hearing; (b) Lower limit of tonal hearing;; (o) Pitch-discrimination; (d) Speaking voice; (e) Singing voice.en
dc.description.abstractThey were also given as a group: II. (a) An intelligence test (Otis, Primary, Form A);. (b) Edinburgh Education Committee's attainment tests in: reading, spelling, vocabulary, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.en
dc.description.abstractAs the investigation covered a very wide field only the principal conclusions will be stated: 1. In the perception of high frequency sounds boys and girls were equally successful. The average upper limit of each group was approximately 18,670 v.d. 2. In the perception of low frequency sounds neither group displayed a superiority. The average lower limit of boys and that of girls was 18.2 v.d. The children regarded this as the most difficult test as they found it hard to distinguish the fundamental hum the octave vibration. The Pitch discrimination test presented less difficulty to the girls than to the boys. They required fewer practice tests and their average threshold was 7.5 v.d. (M.V. 1.8 v.d.; extremes 4.6 and/ 92. and 11.8 v.d.), whereas that of the boys was 9.3 v.d. (M.V. 3.2 v.d.; extremes 4.0 and 20.0) . 4. Of the correlation coefficients calculated between Pitch discrimination and (b(a) intelligence quotients, and ) attainment quotients, the most significant was that between pitch discriminatión and A.Q. 's in reading where the value of?' was found to be + 0.44± 0.099. 5. From examination of the speaking voice it was concluded that the voices of boys and girls were very similar as regards the average pitch levels most frequently employed but that in (a) inflectional movement; (b) quality; (o) fluency; and (d) articulation, the girls were superior. 6. Examination of the singing voice showed that as regards effective voice compass there was no difference between boys and girls. The average range extended from b or c' to e" or fu. 7. In quality, the girls' singing voices were superior to those of the boys. Among the latter, many were marred by huskiness resulting from inflammations set up in the vocal cords by excessive shouting 8. Girls showed greater command over the head - voice mechanism. 9. In discrimination of pitch many children gained assistance from kinaesthetic sensations arising in the larynx. 10.. There appeared to be a considerable degree of relationship between capacity for pitch discrimination and the amplitude and frequency of inflectional movements employed in speech. 11. Girls apparently derive appreciable trainin from their frequent use of inflections i speech. As a result they require fewer practice tests in pitch discrimination. 12. Their greater use of inflectional movement is traceable to their more emotional and less repressive nature.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 15en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleVariations in the normal range of children's voices; variations in range of tone audition; variations in pitch discriminationen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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