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dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, James Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:15:56Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:15:56Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/26141
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIn the mid-1970's different staffing models began to be employed extensively in special education classes, particularly for children with psychosocial disorders. These models include teacher with an aide, teacher with child care worker, and two teachers together. To explore the effects of introducing staffing models into classrooms, staff and student perceptions of social climate were surveyed. Four aspects of staffing models were formulated as the basis on which climate variation w~th staffing model was expected: number of staff per classroom, different roles of staff positions, different role approaches, and relative .) status of different types of staff. An extensive survey of one hundred and twenty-five classes located in Ontario, Canada, indicated only very limited relationships between staffing model and responses to the Classroom Environment Scale. Several context variables related to student, staff and organizational characteristics of classes ·also were compared with the staffing model/climate relationship. Only student age was found to be related to classroom climate to any substantial extent. Qualitative data reported by classroom staff, 'primarily on approaches to organization of the class and on quality of working relationships, also were examined and found not to be related to a significant degree to classroom climate. The results of the survey are discussed in terms of the possibilities and limitations of staffing model and similar changes in the special education classroom context.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 15en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleRelationships between different staffing models, context variables, and social climate in special classes for children with psychosocial disordersen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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