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dc.contributor.authorWright, Reginald E.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:40:41Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:40:41Z
dc.date.issued1956en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/27714
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractBefore 194.8, grammar schools in Northern Ireland drew their pupils from those families who could afford to pay the fees. The child from a poorer home was denied a secondary education unless he managed to win a scholarship. Many grammar schools offered a small number of private scholarships, and, in addition, the Ministry of Education and the local Education Authorities conducted a Scholarship Examination each year. This Examination was in English and Arithmetic, and although 50 per cent was the pass mark, the number of successful candidates far exceeded the number of scholarships available, so awards were made on the order of merit, a means test being taken into consideration. In 1947, over 2,700 candidates out of a year group of approximately 22,000, entered for the Scholarship Examination. Of these, approximately 1,500 reached the 50 per cent standard, but only 609 were awarded scholarships.en
dc.description.abstractThe 1947 Education Act laid down that in future admission to grammar schools was to depend on a Qualifying Examination administered by the Ministry of Education. This examination would be open to all primary pupils who wished to proceed to grammar schools, the means test would be abolished, and the parents of successful candidates would be relieved of all financial outlay.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleSelection for grammar schools in Northern Irelanden
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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