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dc.contributor.authorClayton, Barbara Evelynen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T11:41:37Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T11:41:37Z
dc.date.issued1953en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/27807
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractPART I. The development of an assay method for ACTH based on its inhibiting effect on the formation of granulation tissue, and examination of the physiological factors affecting the response of experimental wound healing to ACTH.en
dc.description.abstractPART II. Adrenal function in guinea pigs with particular reference to scurvy.en
dc.description.abstract1). Adrenocorticotrophic hormone inhibits the formation of granulation tissue in mice, and this fact has been used as the basis of an assay in which a quantal response is measured. Potencies by this method and that of Sayers, Sayers and Woodbury (1948) are in close agreement.en
dc.description.abstract2). Physiological factors affecting the response of experimental wound healing to ACTH have been investigated in mice.en
dc.description.abstracta). No gonadotrophic activity was detected in the sample of ACTH used, and pitressin tannate and chorionic gonadotrophin did not produce this effect.en
dc.description.abstractb). Hypophysectomised mice became progressively and rapidly less responsive to ACTH.en
dc.description.abstractc). The gonads were essential for inhibition in very young and in mature mice.en
dc.description.abstractd). Adrenalectomised mice at the beginning of the breeding season, adrenalectomised pregnant mice, and adrenalectomised mice pretreated with chorionic gonadotrophin showed inhibition of healing by ACTH. Adrenalectomised mice pretreated with follicle - stimulating hormone or pregnant mares' serum gonadotrophin_ were not inhibited.en
dc.description.abstracte). Cortisone acetate caused inhibition in intact and gonadectomised mice. Neither testosterone, oestriol nor oestradiol had any effect, but progesterone gave definite impairment under the conditions of the experiment.en
dc.description.abstractf). It is suggested that in mice the gonads are capable of responding to ACTH under the influence of luteinizing hormone.en
dc.description.abstract3). Cortisone does not inhibit healing in guinea pigs.en
dc.description.abstract4) . a)Guinea pigs placed on a scorbutic diet showed a gradual increase of varying extent in urinary 17- ketosteroid excretion. This reached a peak in the terminal phases. No increase occurred in the absence of the adrenals, but the increase was unaffected by castration.en
dc.description.abstractb). Daily administration of ACTH in acute scurvy failed to influence the fall in body weight or time of ultimate death.en
dc.description.abstractc). Daily administration of cortisone failed to influence the ultimate outcome of acute anC chronic scurvy. Cortisone prevented adrenal hypertrophy in scurvy, and in chronic (but not acute) scurvy it reduced the haemorrhagic manifestations.en
dc.description.abstractd). In animals maintained on a dose of ascorbic acid leading to chronic scurvy, cortisone stimulated new bone formation at the epiphyses.en
dc.description.abstract5). In the late stages of acute scurvy when adrenal ascorbic acid is minimal, there is still a normal response to exogenous ACTH as judged by a rise in urinary 17 -ketosteroid excretion, over and above that due to developing scurvy.en
dc.description.abstract6). Normal pregnant guinea pigs show a greater response to ACTH than non - pregnant ones. Urinary 17- ketosteroid excretion was not increased by gonadotrophin administration to castrated animals.en
dc.description.abstract7). It has been shown that dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) is antiscorbutic. DHA administration leads to the development of characteristic features, which include fatty degeneration of the liver, flexion of the fore and hind feet and partial hind -leg paresis.en
dc.description.abstract8). The dietary intake of adrenalectomised animals has been measured. The possible presence of an important dietary factor, other than ascorbic acid, in cabbage has been discussed.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2017 Block 16en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleStudies of the adrenal cortexen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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