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dc.contributor.authorChambers, Charlotte Nesta Louiseen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-29T12:15:30Z
dc.date.available2018-03-29T12:15:30Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29056
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is an exploration of the politics and practices of environmental management concerning a species of giant clam; pasua (Tridacna maxima) on the island of Tongareva, an atoll in the northern Cook Islands, Eastern South Pacific. In particular, the thesis examines variations in what the Tongarevan people see as the 'problem with pasud and the complex interplay between these different conceptions and the acceptance or not of a proposed customary closure on pasua harvest known as rahui.en
dc.description.abstractThe research accounts for a range of social and power relations and ecological conditions in order to demonstrate the socio-political-ecological nexus that produces pasua management on the island. It explores how authority structures, economic changes and networks of exchange intersect to determine and shape the politics ofpasua harvest and rahui on Tongareva and place both the island and pasua in very specific ways. It engages with recent debates over the significance of so-called traditional knowledge and management practices to argue for and contribute to a more nuanced understanding of environmental management in a South Pacific context. Theoretically, the thesis builds upon recent debates around the social and the environmental as mutually constitutive domains, elaborating this relationship by demonstrating how the use and conservation of pasua is negotiated in and through space.en
dc.description.abstractThe interdisciplinary research design includes analysis of oral histories, key player interviews and participant observation along with findings from a comprehensive survey of pasua abundance and distribution in the lagoon. It pursues this combination of data collection not in order to use ecological 'facts' to verify social 'beliefs' but because it sees such knowledges as different but equally valid -if differently empowered - forms of knowledge.en
dc.description.abstractOverall the thesis suggests a different analytic lens for examining environmental management. It challenges the self-evidence of place, the existence of clear-cut 'environmental problems' and the idea that traditional practices can be unproblematically implemented. It suggests a relational approach that recognises the social, mobile and networked characteristics of the species, people and places under consideration so as to encourage attention to the varied topography of environmental problems and to develop similarly nuanced solutions accordingly.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 17en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleBounding the lagoon: spatialising practices and the politics of Rahui Tongareva, Cook Islandsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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