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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Thomas Gowen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-29T12:20:39Z
dc.date.available2018-03-29T12:20:39Z
dc.date.issued1944
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29398
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractAt the British Congress'on Tuberculosis held in London in 1901, Koch announced that human tuberculosis was distinct from bovine tuberculosis and could not be transmitted to cattle. He went further and, on the analogy of his experimental failure to infect calvos and sviine with progressive tuberculosis by inoculation with the human bacillus, he assumed as a corollary that the bovine tubercle bacillus must be harmless for man.en
dc.description.abstractThis assertion was contested and investigations were instituted in this country and abroad to inquire into the relations of human and animal tuberculosis. In 1911 a Royal Commission in L]ngland reported the results of official investigations; extensive corroboration of the findings from other home and foreign workers proved conclusively that Koch was wrong in his opinion that the bovine tubercle bacillus was a negligible factor in human tuberculosis.en
dc.description.abstractInterest in Scotland has been centred mainly in the incidence in human tuberculosis of the different types of tubercle bacillus. Fraser (1912) examined 67 cases of bone and joint tuberculosis in children and found that 61.2% were infected with bovine bacilli. Wang (1917) reported 55% of bovine infections in 20 children under sixteen years of age and 10.3% in 68 adults in the Edinburgh district. Munro and Cumming (1926) found bovine bacilli in 36.4% of 55 cases of surgical tuberculosis in the East of Scotland. Blacklock (1936) isolated the bovine bacillus from 82.2% of 73 children with primary abdominal tuberculosis and from 63.3% of 30 patients with cervical gland tuberculosis. He noted a higher incidence of bovine bacilli in country than in Glasgow children. Blacklock and Griffen (1935) found that 22% of cases of cerebral tuberculosis in children in the same West of Scotland area were due to the bovine bacillus.en
dc.description.abstractThe importance of factors other than the type of organism had become manifest for it was obvious that the proportional frequency of the type of infecting organism varied greatly in different districts.en
dc.description.abstractGriffith (1934), in surveying the results of typing 265 strains of tubercle bacilli isolated from cases of tuberculous meningitis occurring between 1905 and 1933 and derived from widely separated areas throughout the United Kingdom, noted that the incidence of bovine infection was higher, in general, in country places and rural towns than it was in cities. Munro and Scott (1936) reviewed the relative frequency of human and bovine bacilli recovered from cerebro-spinal fluids in patients from the East of Scotland and concluded that bovine infection was an urgent rural problem as, in the series examined, the incidence of this type was three times greater in rural areas than it was in cities. This conclusion was supported by the work of Macgregor and Green (1937) who found 2% of bovine infections in 68 cases of tuberculous meningitis occurring in the City of Edinburgh and 25 in 29 cases from the adjoining country districts.en
dc.description.abstractThe importance of raw milk was stressed by these workers as a possible reason for the rural preponderance of the bovine type of tubercle bacillus, however, in an investigation of 91 patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis and residing in the rural areas and small towns in the North East of Scotland, Griffith and Smith (1935) found 14.45 with bovine tubercle bacilli in the sputum. The possibility of infection of susceptibles with the bovine organism by such persons is a factor that cannot be overlooked.en
dc.description.abstractWright and Wright (1942) discussed the influence of social conditions on illness in childhood in London Boroughs. They analysed statistical data of the morbidity and mortality of diphtheria, measles, whooping cough and tuberculosis for the period 1924 - 1938 and, by comparing with data for social conditions in the same area, they determined the correlation between illness and social factors. The effects of substandard housing and of the deprivation of many of the amenities of life - food, heat and clothing - through deficient economic resources were noted as important factors in the distribution of tuberculosis among young children; the authors concluded that it would be unwise to infer how poverty operates in addition to the increased physical proximity of overcrowding.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 17en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleA survey of tuberculosis in an industrial county of Scotland: the influence of social factors on the incidence of tuberculosis infectionsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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