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dc.contributor.authorYajima, Naokien
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-29T12:21:05Z
dc.date.available2018-03-29T12:21:05Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29432
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation attempts to read David Hume's "A Treatise of Human Nature: an attempt of introducing an experimental method of reasoning into moral subjects", as a consistent moral theory, by showing the underlying unity of the three Books of the Treatise. In particular, I argue that the concept of the "general point of view" plays a central role in unifying the Treatise, which in the final instance proves to be about normativity. Most of all, I clarify the parallel between Hume's epistemology and his moral theory. I attempt to present Hume's moral theory as what I call "a constructivism of perceptions".en
dc.description.abstractI start by exploring Hume's epistemology and his concept of custom, fundamentally understood as a principle of stability. I clarify that custom consists in recognizing a particular perception in association with other resembling perceptions. I claim this is what it means to take the general point of view. I then show that custom is the basis of Hume's theory of causation, where the concept of custom plays the central role of embodying the general point of view. I show that because of the development of custom Hume's theory of causation is related to his theory of the perception of external bodies, which completes our perception of physical circumstances.en
dc.description.abstractIn the later chapters I argue that Hume's theory of sympathy should be understood as a principle of sociability that confers shared value on both possessions and human behaviour. I next explain Hume's theory of justice as a regulating principle of social interaction that centres on property as causation. I argue that justice exerts a binding force beyond personal interests because its normative force derives from the sense of stability acquired in physical perceptions. Then, I discuss Hume's theory ofpromise regulates future interaction between people. Finally, I show that because of the authority of custom, government is allowed to demand people's allegiance, just as an external body is required to stabilise causal perception.en
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation shows that the general point of view provides the foundation ofmorality by establishing a stable relationship between human beings and their circumstances: physical, psychological, moral, and political.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 17en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleThe general point of view as the normative and unifying concept in Hume's Treatiseen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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