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dc.contributor.authorEager, Rachel Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T10:12:35Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T10:12:35Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29743
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractAccurate pain assessment is fundamental to optimal pain management, representing a major welfare concern. Pain assessment has received considerable attention in farm, laboratory and companion animals, however, there is little objective equine pain research. This study aimed to objectively identify behavioural indicators of pain, examining both acute post-operative (castration) and chronic (laminitis) pain.en
dc.description.abstractMale thoroughbred horses (n=T0/group) underwent castration or sham castration (control) performed under either standing surgical sedation (SS) or general anaesthesia (GA). Horses were monitored for 24 hours pre-operatively and 48 hours post¬ operatively. Additionally, seven acute laminitic horses and paired age, sex and breedmatched controls were monitored for up to five days. Assessments were made using time-lapse video recording and direct observation of undisturbed spontaneous behaviour and evoked human interaction behaviours. Data were acquired using The Observer™ and analysed using generalised mixed effects (GME) and discriminant analysis (DA).en
dc.description.abstractGA and SS castrates spent more time with their ears back and displayed a higher frequency of stepping away than controls in interactive tests (P<0.017, GME). Head level with withers increased post-operatively in SS castrate, but not control horses (P<0.001, GME). Additionally, sham GA resulted in increased inattentive behaviour and hindlimb resting and reduced 'head up' and recumbency (P<0.039, GME). Laminitic horses showed reduced hindlimb resting and walking with increased lying, 'head level' and forelimb lifting compared to controls (P<0.046, GME). Accuracy of discrimination (DA) between 'painful' and 'pain-free' horses was >78.6% in acute and chronic pain.en
dc.description.abstractWe identified behavioural parameters indicative of pain and discomfort in acute and chronic pain states. Acute pain may be most accurately identified through the examination of evoked behaviour, whilst changes in spontaneous behaviour appear more altered in chronic pain.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 18en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleClinical pain assessment in the horseen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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