Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSack, O. W.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-14T10:15:55Z
dc.date.available2018-05-14T10:15:55Z
dc.date.issued1962en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/29979
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe morphogenesis of the pharyngeal region is believed to be involved in the occurrence of so-called "Branchial Cysts", a condition affecting human and canine adolescents of comparable age, and which is characterised by the appearance of cystic lesions on the lateral aspects of the upper portion of the neck. These lesions are usually small in the human, while in the dog, due to the presence of a hair coat, they remain undiscovered until they have become large and pendulous. It is generally believed that branchial cysts arise from remnants of the branchial apparatus which are induced to proliferate by certain hormonal combinations present in the young individual. Investigators (Bhaskar and Bernier, 1959)» who recently examined a large number of human lesions deny a purely branchiogenic origin however, and postulate that epithelial remnants of bronchial or, what is more likely, parotid origin, after becoming trapped in developing lymph nodes, produce this condition, which according to their view should be renamed "Benign Lymphoepithelial Cysts".en
dc.description.abstractInvestigations into the etiology of branchial cysts in the dog, at present being carried out at the author's home university (Ontario Veterinary College, University of Toronto), became focused on the developmental processes of the pharyngeal region in that animal, because experience with the human condition suggested a developmental defect. 2 A search of the literature available to the author revealed that the development of the canine pharyngeal region was practically unknown, only some selected aspects such as the early development of the thyroid and parathyroids having been described by Godwin (193^S 1937 a) of the Kingsbury school. It was uncovered further that the developmental anatomy of the dog as a whole had scarcely been studied, which is surprising in view of this animal's importance to the veterinary surgeon and to the research worker.en
dc.description.abstractThe present study, then, was undertaken in an attempt to close the obvious gap in our knowledge of canine embryogenesis, and to provide those interested in the etiology of branchial cysts with what might be considered a working basis for further clinical and embryological examinations. It was found necessary to survey the entire field of pharyngeal development, from the appearance of a foregut to conditions found at full term, since confinement of the field, even though it could have been explored to much greater depth, would have proved useful neither to those interested in canine embryology nor to those studying branchial cysts. The former would find that the large gap in the knowledge of this region still persisted and the latter would not be able to select the particular anatomical region or developmental stage which may interest them for further scrutiny.en
dc.description.abstractThe lack of previous work on canine development and subsequent absence of known standards of developmental reference made it necessary to devote much space to the description and staging of the einbryological material prior to sectioning. The hulk of the thesis however is devoted to the description of the developmental processes observed in the pharyngeal region, and minor points worthy of short discussion are dealt with here, because it was thought that due to the wide field covered in this study a separate discussion would appear rather disjointed. Major anatomical areas however have been extracted from this section and are presented at the end in the form of REGIONAL REVIEWS.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 18en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleThe development of the pharyngeal region in the dogen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record