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dc.contributor.authorFarris, William James Stalkeren
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:38:34Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:38:34Z
dc.date.issued1954en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30187
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe dominant immanental character of nineteenth century theology was directly related to the epistemological problem in modern thought, which had reached a climax with Kant's bifurcation of knowledge into noumenal and phenomenal elements and his consequent restriction of metaphysics. The developmental philosophy of history, advanced by Lessing and Herder, and the Romanticist individuality and wholeness of outlook, were further contributory influences upon the pattern of the theology of the period.en
dc.description.abstractSchleiermacher's theology of experience embodied the Romanticist outlook in making a state of feeling, orientated upon the universe, normative for religious truth. Having rejected metaphysics, he confined all determinate knowledge of God and of His relation to the world, to a description of states of religious consciousness.en
dc.description.abstractIn German idealist philosophy, Romanticism found a variant expression as an organon of reflective awareness. Hegel made God the final term of a system of rational harmony in which the Idea triumphs over all antitheses of experiential reality. His system could be characterized as a 'panentheism', in which God is not simply identified with the world, but is made the Absolute, under which the world is organically subsumed.en
dc.description.abstractBaur used the Hegelian dialectic to remove the transcendent uniqueness of Christian history, regarding the latter as the necessary evolution of the Absolute. In Strauss, the same pattern of thought, coupled with a radical Biblical criticism, reduced Gospel history to universal religious truth, immanent to the religious consciousness. Biedermenn did not effectively fulfill his aim of uniting the philosophy of the Absolute with an independent, objective world of reality.en
dc.description.abstractIn British theology, Coleridge introduced an idealist impulse, in terms of which an idea, or spiritual truth, was conceived to be more important than Biblical history or the historic dogma. Toward the end of the century, neo-Hegelianism developed a more absolute idealist system which made God the end term of a process of development, a. view which accorded well with contemporary, optimistic and evolutionary thought.en
dc.description.abstractThe historical positivism of Ritschl eliminated metaphysical or transcendental knowledge of God. Doctrinal knowledge concerning God was made subject to the judgment of its worth for the individual. His method promoted an approach to the study of religious history whereby universal religious values were gleaned from the various historical manifestations of religion. In the thought of Troeltsch, God is little more than a principle of purposive development within the flow of historical process.en
dc.description.abstractThe present reaction to nineteenth century immanentism was prefigured within that century itself, in Kierkegaard's rejection of a theory of knowledge and his insistence upon the absolute disjunction between the human and the Divine, a chasm which can be bridged only by the paradoxical action of Divine grace and the leap of human faith. Martin Kahler challenged syncretic historicism, in the centrality which he accorded to Christology and in his belief that Biblical history is qualified by suprahistorical factors distinguishing it from general history.en
dc.description.abstractIn these protests we have the essential elements of contemporary revived transcendentalism, and Biblically-centred theology. We may properly conclude that, in Biblical faith, a view of God's sovereign holiness is found united with a belief in the immediacy of His presence in revelation and providential action.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe concept of divine immanence in the theology of the nineteenth centuryen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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