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dc.contributor.authorGutekunst, Gurney O.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:39:12Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:39:12Z
dc.date.issued1963
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30235
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis study of Milton's conception of the Christian life is based upon an analysis and Interpretation of the works from 1624 to 1640. For the earliest period, major themes are dealt with individually, and the development of these themes is considered chronologically, insofar as this could be determined. Major works are discussed in chronological order. Special attention i3 given to likely philosophical, theological and (to a lessor extent) literary sources of Milton's thought, and the historical development of some of the most Important doctrines is traced. Significant parallels of seventeenth century Puritan thought with that of Milton are noted, and further attention to this matter is given in an appendix. The Christian concept of grace is also reviewed in an appendix. Independent interpretations of the works have been made, but the literature of Milton criticism has been given careful attention and the most Important contri¬ butions for the purposes of this paper have been noted, ipecial interpretations of some of the difficult passages in Milton's works are offered.en
dc.description.abstractMilton's earliest interests were in normal relationships that prove epochal fob an individual's life. He was caught up by these interests in a kind of loyalty, and he was conscious of being attracted and distracted by them at the same time. His Prolusions Indicate a special awareness of error, evil and human corruption in contrast to a truth which is symbolized more than conceptualised In these exercises. There is no Integration of outlook in Milton's earliest works, which are premised upon classical conceptions as often as upon Christian ones. But the strength of his loyalties made him conscious that this lack of integration needed to be resolved.en
dc.description.abstractThe Nativity Ode expresses the resolution of his many loyalties into a single loyalty to Christ. From this point onward Milton's works Indicate that a progressive integration and development of his thought took place. L'Allegro and II Pensero show a freedom from constraint and a liberality of outlook such as a steadied faith can result in. The Seventh Prolusion is a major contribution to the Interpretation of learning as an art of ordering one's interests and one's life. Milton's own dedication and the care with which he came to make it are expressed in sonnet and a "Letter to a Friend." The early Horton poems affirm the intended harmony which Christ's incarnation and atonement reveal to be the basis of a life of faith. Fidelity to this intended harmony becomes the dominant Interest In Milton's subsequent works. A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle offers an interpretation of a life of faith dependent upon the microcosmic-macrocosmic correspondences whose possibilities for good have been renewed. Fidelity to the intended harmony and to the heavenly power that makes it possible is the subject of this poem. It presents the Individual In his life of faith finding the necessary resources to affirm the good within himself and all creation when an intruding power confronts him with strong temptations to succumb to faithlessness, Lycidas presents the individual dedicated to upholding and fostering the intended harmony confronted by the final threat of chaos, death, and overcoming It by faith. The Epltaphlum Damonls affirms that such faith is strong enough to cope with grief and to rely upon the power of heaven to support eternally the human love which constitutes the highest form of intended harmony which men can share.en
dc.description.abstractIn these works Milton develops a conception of a structured faith, consistently Protestant, in which a doctrine of Intended harmony supplants the Catholic concept of natural lav; and offers a means of structuring and ordering life by moans of grace in a more thoroughgoing way than other Protestant thinkers appear to have done.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleLight and direction. John Milton's conception of the Christian life as developed in his works from 1624 to 1640: a critical studyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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