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dc.contributor.authorLorgunpai, Sereeen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:44:06Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:44:06Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30400
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe Book of Ecclesiastes is unique. This suggests that Qohelet's thought is not, as some scholars have maintained, dependent on other thinkers of his time. Qohelet interacts with and challenges wisdom tradition and other contemporary beliefs. His theology is not limited to Israelite religion. His concern is universal and not confined to the people of Israel. Although Qohelet does not interact directly with the teachings of the Buddha, this thesis argues that the theological content of Ecclesiastes can be profitably studied in comparison with Buddhism. Though the Buddha and Qohelet are separated from each other by time, geography and culture, they share a common focus on human suffering-dukkha in Pali, hebel in Hebrew. The Buddha maintains that desire is the primary cause of human suffering; Qohelet sees it as deriving from various causes, including human limitations, and the unpredictability of life.en
dc.description.abstractThe Buddha looks for a way to end human suffering, recognising that if human beings continue to be reborn in the world, they will continue to suffer. He then suggests that human beings should break the cycle of rebirth (kamma) and seek nibbana or the state of emptiness. This state can be reached through strenuous meditation. Qohelet, on the other hand, believes that God has created this world with a definite plan; however, humans lack the capacity to understand the present events of the world and are unable to predict the future. Qohelet advises human beings to enjoy life on a day-to-day basis, rather than hope for a better future. While admitting that there are many unpleasant things in this world, Qohelet still loves living in it. He is much more in and of this world than is the Buddha. Seeing that the pleasant things in this world are transitory (anicca) and illusory, the Buddha decided to leave the world behind. Qohelet is the world lover. The Buddha is the world leaver.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis has three main parts. Part one discusses the nature of the Book of Ecclesiastes in detail. Beginning with a general review of scholarly opinion on the book, the discussion continues with the status of its author, its audiences, its style and language, its structure and purposes. Though these discussions are not used in the comparison, they are important for understanding Qohelet's thought. Two chapters which are essential for the later comparison include a discussion of the key words of the book and its main teachings. Part two provides the history of Theravada Buddhism in Thailand and discusses the main concepts of Buddhism, including kamma, anicca, dukkha, anattd, meditation, arahant and nibbana. Part three compares the two traditions. A detailed comparison is undertaken in the following areas: Qohelet's understanding of God and the Law of Kamma, the theological implication of Hebel and Dukkha, Observation and Meditation as ways of encountering the world, the Sages and Arahants as interpreters, Work and Merit-making as human activities, and Joy and Nibbana as responses to what humankind has been given.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis aims to help Thai Christians to find some common ground for dialogue with Thai Buddhists and to open up the much-neglected area of Jewish-Buddhist dialogue.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleWorld lover, world leaver: the Book of Ecclesiastes and Thai Buddhismen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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