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dc.contributor.authorAldeen, Abdul Jabbar Ghazi Ghayathen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:44:50Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:44:50Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30459
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractWhen living cells or tissues are reduced to very low temperatures cell and tissue destruction can occur. The controlled destruction of diseased tissue in clinical patients by the application of cold is termed - CRYOSURGERY - in which Kryos in ancient Greek means frost.en
dc.description.abstractCryosurgery is a clinicEil technique applied to diseased animal tissues and particularly to malignant tumours. The diseased tissues are subjected to direct sub-zero temperatures. Following treatment the tissues necrose and are sloughed. The subsequent healing is by secondary intention. Cryosurgery is being used increasingly in human and veterinary practice and many questions remain to be answered about the destructive power of cryosurgery on living tissue and the fate of non-diseased tissue adjacent to a cryosurgical lesion.en
dc.description.abstractThere is a considerable amount of recorded data concerning tissue damage, death and repair following several types of injury including the effect of freezing. This present study was designed to observe the effect of controlled freezing on living tissues to cryogenic or cryo-destructive temperatures, with particular reference to the healing processes involved and the degree of tissue repair in different areas of the cryo-lesion.en
dc.description.abstractSkeletal muscle and peripheral nerves are frequently frozen either intentionally or inadvertently, during cryo-therapy of deeper lesions and it was considered important to examine the effects of cold injury in these tissues.en
dc.description.abstractThe investigation is related to the histopathology of the tissue changes during destruction, repair and regeneration employing light microscopy and electron microscopy techniques.en
dc.description.abstractCryosurgery has been employed with success in the treatment of lesions of the skin and adnexa in man and some species of domestic animals but comparable results have not been achieved in treating benign fibrous skin tumours in the horse (Borthwick, 1970). There was a high percentage of recurrence of neoplasms in cryosurgically treated horse skin. The clinical problems of the surgery of horse skin stimulated the third part of the investigations reported in this thesis.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleLight and electron microscopical studies of the effect of cryosurgery on skeletal muscle and peripheral nerve of the guinea pig and horse skinen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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