Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBhopal, Raj
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-14T10:13:25Z
dc.date.available2009-09-14T10:13:25Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.issn1743-1913
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/3057
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/rmp/dhsc/2005/00000002/00000002/art00006
dc.descriptionThis article appears in Diversity in Health and Social Care 2005;2:119–25en
dc.description.abstractHistorically, it is impossible to ignore the impact of Hitler on the social and philosophical concept of race. By the start of World War II in 1939 his book Mein Kampf had sold 5 200 000 copies and been translated into 11 languages. His views had a particular impact on the practice of medicine. Reading Hitler today ought to increase the resolve of medical and other health professionals - 'the staunchest supporters of the Nazi regime' - to combat racism. 'Inter-racial' divisions in modern society are still reflected in health gradients, and modern genetics has re-awoken discussion of eugenic theories. This paper, based on quotations from Hitler on racial admixture, the superiority of the Aryan race and the creation of a superior society, seeks to assist professionals in health and health sciences to reflect on these writings and to strengthen anti-racism in public health, medicine and science. The author contends that racism is a major public health issue.en
dc.format.extent82976 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectEugenicsen
dc.subjectGeneticsen
dc.subjectPublic healthen
dc.subjectRacismen
dc.subjectethnicity
dc.titleHitler on race and health in Mein Kampf: a stimulus to anti-racism in the health professionsen
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record