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dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Edwin Kendricken
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:47:29Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:47:29Z
dc.date.issued1954en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30689
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis studv has attempted to understand Gibbon* s approach to eoolesiastioal history and to evaluate it in the light of current thinking on the subject. It was seen that three major sources contributed to the historian*s preparation: the eighteenth century environment, the impact of external oircumstances, and certain individual qualities in the man himself. It was indicated that Gibbon had a * philosophy of history* only in the empirical sense of possessing a fundamental viewpoint from which he approached his materials. His treatment of his predecessors was defended from the oharga of being *ore-Cooernican* on the strength of the fact that he made an unmistakable atteaot to assess the trustworthiness of his authorities, however inadequate by ourrent standards*en
dc.description.abstractGibbon*s attitude towards ecclesiastical history, it was argued, did not spring from a specific antagonism against Christianity but from a general feeling for life which was in operation over the total range of his experience and observation. -Prominent in this outlook were an admiration for ancient Rome, a reflection of eighteenth century rationalism and scientism; a distrust for zeal, and a sense of the importance of individual independence. Understandably, Gibbon applied this predisposition of his mind to the materials of ecclesiastical history.en
dc.description.abstractIt was further argued that Gibbon*s treatment of Christianity must be traced against the background of his interest in all the factors involved in Rome's decay and fall rather than on the common and erroneous supposition that he had singled out Christianity as the chief cause of the catastrophe.en
dc.description.abstractIt was concluded that Gibbon's employment of the ironical device of limiting his consideration of Christianity to an inquiry into the 'secondary' causes of its success was an important element in the defence of his work as a restricted and a scientific study. It was seen also that his apparent unawareness of his assumptions was a most significant Use other side if necessary. weakness; for it betrayed Mm, in Ms irony ana mnuenao, inuo a axsmissal of the Supernatural from history, a dismissal which could not be substantiated by the evidence of critical history. It was concluded, however, that lasting importance may be attached to Gibbon's inquiry for its insight into the eighteenth century mentality, for its alternate view of ecclesiastical history, for its effect upon subsequent approaches to the subject, and for its attack upon a mistaken conception of the 'historical' element in Faith itself.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleAttitude of Edward Gibson towards ecclesiastical historyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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