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dc.contributor.authorCollie, Eliza Robertsonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:47:31Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:47:31Z
dc.date.issued1925en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30693
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIt is reiterated. that the study of averages makes the assumption that each age group represents what the preceding age group will become anc , further that a study of this nature reveals directly, nothing regarding the individual difference in rate of growth i or individual variations of all kind that inay arise, except in exceptional cases. The limitations thus imposed upon the study of mental growth changes are , therefore obvious. But for the study of the main problem here, the method of group testing is not entirely without justification. Neither is it without value. So much emphasis is laid on the imperfections of the method that it is forgotten how few ,good tests are available even for the individual testing of older subjects. What it is desired to know here is the general movement of the average curve from age to age. It cannot be claimed that the choice of subjects here employed facilitated the discovery of the upper limit of the grovth of intelligence but at least with additional true information, some idea of the age of mental arrest for average subjects has been deduced.en
dc.description.abstractThe conclusions from the study of GEORGE: WATSON'S BOYS' COLLEGE results are that a slowing down of average mental growth is apparent after 14 years and that since selection operates from 15 years onwards, there is no sign Of a counter balance in increased average score from then onwards (This result applies to both tests.) They assumption then is, that after 15 years the slowing down will continue and absolute zero average growth be apparent by 16 years. The same conclusions can be derived from the results of the first test applied. to EDINBURGH LADIES' COLLEGE pupils, and under more favourable circumstances would have been directly derivable from the Second test.en
dc.description.abstractThe results obtained from both tests applied to JAMES CLARK SCHOOL indicate a slightly lower point of arrest but the conclusions are handicapped by selective forces operating at both ends of the school so that it is difficult to be definite in fixating the age of mental arrest . Presumably shortly after 15 years is the best point to suggest.en
dc.description.abstractWhen due regard of the superior social status of the GEORGE WATSON'S BOYS' COLLEGE and EDINBURGH LADIES' COLLEGE subjects is taken and also of the average social status of the JAMES CLARK subject it is inevitable that adherence to 15 years rather than 16 years should follow. The conclusion that the upper limit of the growth of average intelligence is ranched at or about 15 years receives particular confirmation from the fact that DUNFERMLINE PHYSICAL TRAINING COLLEGE subjects in the first year of testing did not reach and HERIOT WATT COLLEGE subjects in the second year of testing did not exceed the 16 year old level. Of all adult subjects they most nearly approach average mentality. The adult results in conclusion with. EDINBURGH PROVINCIAL TRAINING COLLEGE indicate only a 17 year old level for the subjects and they are undoubtedly of superior intelligence on the average.en
dc.description.abstractRegarding the tendency of the general curve to bend noticeably at 18 years and the tendency of the adult average curve to approximate to the 18 year old level only a few words need be said. The fact that the subjects are generally of superior intelligence beyond 18 years seem to indicate that the bend of the curve is not lacking in significance and that it is a suggestion of an average upper limit of the growth of superior intelligence occurring at 18 year Perhaps the desirability of finding such a result is a. bias. The curve form may only be true to chance; but it in thought not. The 13 year old school children are rigorously selected.and also the post graduate subjects. The addition of lower subjects at the adult years is slight. Undoubtedly the chief reason why the suggestion cannot be pushed farther is, that an inadequate number of adult subjects have been suggested.en
dc.description.abstractThe outcome of the investigation is a refutation of the finding of the American Army testing:, that on the average mental growth ceases after 13 -i years. The indications of these experiments are that on the average, mental growth con-. tinues at a very slow rate from 12 to 15 years, and that after 15 years no appreciable improvement can be observed. The conclusion, are not contradictory to the findings or opinions of the bast investigator$ in the realm of mental testing.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleOn the upper limit of the growth of intelligence as determined by mental testingen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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