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dc.contributor.authorRoss, Joyen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:47:38Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:47:38Z
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30705
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis research project primarily investigated the relationship between fantasy, schizotypal personality traits, psychological distress, criminal thinking styles and violent offending behaviour. A number of studies have explored the relationship between fantasy life and sexual offending, but few have investigated this in relation to non -sexual violence. This is the first of its kind to do so with a forensic sample, where violent behaviour is corroborated, rather than self-reported. Firstly a systematic review of the literature around the impact of psychological therapies on reducing violent behaviour was completed. Ten papers were identified and critically reviewed. The resulting synthesis of these studies indicated that psychological intervention, at least in the short term, can reduce violent behaviour. However, there was little evidence of a long -term impact of psychological therapies on reducing violent behaviour. The second part of the research project was a survey of 138 male prisoners which investigated the relationships between psychological distress, schizotypal personality traits and criminal thinking styles. In addition, differences in fantasy styles: negative, positive and narcissistic, and schizotypal personality according to level of violent behaviour were explored, as were differences in fantasy styles between criminal thinking style groups. Kendall's Tau -b correlation analyses, Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc specific comparison tests indicated no significant differences in fantasy style scores between the violent behaviour groups or thinking style categories, but revealed that many of the variables explored were strongly correlated. The findings differed from those of a previous general population study, by finding that fantasy style did not differ according to level of violence, but provided new findings in terms of relationships between criminal thinking styles and fantasy style. In an area with little existing research this warrants further exploration.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleTreatments and predictors of violent behaviour: the role of fantasy and schizotypal personality traitsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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