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dc.contributor.authorRyrie, Charles Caldwellen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:47:45Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:47:45Z
dc.date.issued1954en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30714
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractWith regard to women, Christianity's inheritance from ancient Greece and Rome was small. In Greece, with the exception of Macedonia, women were definitely considered as inferiors and were kept in utter seclusion in the family. Stranger women, of course, had liberty, but the price of that liberty was harlotry. Legally, the Roman matron was little better off, but practically she had much more freedom. This freedom brought the undesirable result of widespread moral laxity; yet it prepared the way for the freedom of activity of Christian women in the early days of the spread of Christianity throughout the Empire. There is no doubt that when the Christian message came with its insistence on absolute purity it brought protection and elevation of the status of women. Although it is very true that in many respects the Christian Church worked its leaven within the framework of existing conditions, in respect to the standards of purity expected in its women, "specifically Christian motives and sanctions are introduced."^ The Apologists are persistent in their use of the higher standards of Christianity toward women as an apologetic for the truth of the Christian message, and their very insistence underlines the uniqueness of this feature of the Christian message.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleStatus of women in the life of the church during the first three centuriesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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