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dc.contributor.authorStamper, Bryan Craigen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:48:28Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:48:28Z
dc.date.issued1974
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30782
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to establish the influence of Martin Heidegger*s philosophy on leading contemporary theologians. In doing so it will be shown how various and occasionally opposing theological views can validly claim to have adapted the thoughts of the same philosopher. The first division of this analysis will consider the nature of Heidegger*s philosophy. It will be maintained that ontology is his primary interest and that he pursues Being through the consideration of such topics as man (Dasein), language, and thought, as well as Being itself (in its various manifestations as truth, nothingness and the *ontological difference').en
dc.description.abstractThis philosopher's development will be traced from an earlier emphasis on the initiative of man (Dasein) in the relation to Being to a reactionary emphasis on Being as totally dominating man to a final, balanced appreciation of the role of both man and Being in their relationship. This balance will be the criterion by which the various theological adaptations of this philosophy will be gauged. In the second division Rudolf Bultmann*s theology will be seen as strongly influenced by the earlier, existential concerns of Heidegger. The resulting lack of balance in his theology will be seen in the often heard charges that it is subjective and anthropocentric. The relevance of the later Heidegger's more balanced views will then be suggested. It will then be established that the 'new hermeneutic' theologians (Ernst Fuchs, Gerhard Ebeling and ii Heinrich Ott) are strongly Influenced by Heidegger's later belief that Being as language totally dominates man. The extremity of their views will be exposed in the expanded role they assign to language and hermeneutics (It is through language that all beings are granted their Being and that the authenticity of existence is gained. Hermeneutics thus concerns all of reality and existence.) Heidegger's insight that the roles of both beings (of which man is one type) and Being must be respected in their relationship will then be proposed as a valuable corrective to the position of the 'new hermeneutic' theologians. In John Macquarrie's existential-ontological theology will be seen a position which strives to maintain the balance of Heidegger's position. Like Bultmann and the earlier Heidegger, Macquarrie will be portrayed as respecting the need for an existential emphasis and like the 'new herraeneutic' theologians and the later Heidegger his interest in the initiative of Being or God will also be shown. And finally his appreciation for the balance of Heidegger's philosophy will be established as a vital factor in the relevance and clarity of Macquarrie's existential-ontological theology.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe influence of Martin Heidegger's philosophy on Bultmannian and post-Bultmannian theologyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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