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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Reid Winfielden
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:48:35Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:48:35Z
dc.date.issued1976en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30796
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe voluntary principle had opportunity to take root in Scot¬ land several centuries before John Glas of Pealing began to expound his ideas in the 1720's, but even Glas' movement remained small. However, his writings were, during the ensuing century, to influence Scottish dissenters. Within the Secession the early criticisms of the Established church were not of its standards which the dissen¬ ters took as their own, but with what were considered abuses, such as patronage, lax discipline, and heterodox teaching. The voluntary stand can be said to be traced back to the rejection of patronage and Erastian infringements such as the reading from the pulpit of the Porteous enactment for one year.en
dc.description.abstractDuring the formative years of the Secession inconsistent views on the place of the magistrate in matters of religion seemed to be accepted. The position of Thomas Nairn caused the Associate Pres¬ bytery to state more clearly, its views in 17^3. The position regarding the covenants came to be questioned by some of the younger dissenters as more tolerant views began to develop. From 1753 the Secession began to send missionaries to the American colonies, and the voluntary principle made more rapid progress there than in Scotland; feedback began to show its influence in Scotland.en
dc.description.abstractThe Relief church began without the feelings of animosity which so often characterized the Secession. Thomas Gillespie's dis¬ position affected the movement which was not as a^ressive in out¬ reach as the Secession. The Relievers did not publish an official testimony, but individual ministers wrote pamphlets, usually in defense of Relief positions with Patrick Hutchison being the best known.en
dc.description.abstractIn the Antiburgher body, the voluntary principle was sown in the minds of theological students through the instruction of the philosophical class teachers, Alexander Pirie being the first one to have what could be called a "school" develop. The American revolution began the slow movement toward more democratic views in Scotland, and the French revolution, coming at the time agri¬ culture had begun to make striking advances and industry was developing, had an even greater effect, the 1790's were years of doctrinal ferment in the Secession when newer views on the place of the magistrate found expression in acts of the Burghers and Antiburghers.en
dc.description.abstractThroughout the first century of Scottish dissent, growth was slow but persistent. Numbers were needed before the voluntary church controversy could begin. With the industrial revolution development, dissenting congregations began to spring up and flourish in the industrial belt. Dissent became more respectable, and the people had money to build impressive edifices, looking like Greek temples. Congregations of more than one thousand mttmbers wielded influence, and the ministers were respected beyond the bounds Of the congregations.en
dc.description.abstractThe stage was now set for open controversy. The dissenters claimed about one-third of the population by 1830, and they had sufficient income and respectability to be heard. In Bible societies and Missionary societies, they had learned to work together. Electoral franchise enlargement showed the dissenters their voice could bring change, and the voluntary controversy developed into a heated battle which was nearly quenched by the Disruption of 1843.en
dc.description.abstractIn order to show the progress of the voluntary principle among Scottish dissenters, the growth of the Secession and Relief churches has been traced. The stipends paid at different periods, the costs of church erections, and other aspects of finance examined. The acceptance of the concept of a loyal opposition allowed the dissenters a voice which was not considered seditious when questioning the status quo. The development of the voluntary principle of support in the Secession began out of necessity in 17*4-0. It was found to be adequate, and as the dissenters increased in a time of greater financial prosperity and intellectual enlight¬ enment, they became a force with which to be reckoned in Scottish religious life. The development of the voluntary principle and practice is traced in the Secession and Relief churches till their union in 1847.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe development of the voluntary principle and practice in Scotland particulalry in the antecedents of the United Presbyterian Churchen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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