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dc.contributor.authorStinton, Diane Barbaraen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:48:36Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:48:36Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30797
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores and analyses voices of contemporary African christology, integrating selected textual and oral christologies from sub-Saharan Africa outside of South Africa. The critical concern for African Christians to articulate their perceptions of Jesus' identity and significance has spawned a proliferation of written christologies during the past few decades. To date there is little substantive analysis of these creative christologies, which prompts the present study. Christological texts from the following six theologians provide a cross-section of reflections from Catholic and Protestant traditions: Benezet Bujo, Jean-Marc Ela, J. N. K. Mugambi, Mercy Oduyoye, Anne Nasimiyu Wasike, and John Pobee. Given the vitality of Christian experience in Africa today, informal expressions of theology warrant serious consideration. Oral christologies are therefore gained from personal interviews with the six theologians, plus qualitative field research in Kenya, Uganda and Ghana. Individual interviews and focus groups capture the voices of urban, educated Christians including men and women, Catholics and Protestants, and clergy and laity. Christological investigation is also enhanced by informal christologies gleaned through participant observation in a variety of Christian settings in the specified contexts.en
dc.description.abstractFollowing an introduction to the subject and methods of study, the main body of the thesis examines central themes which emerge from the christological data. The research process configures current christologies in four broad categories intrinsically related to one another. Each category represents a cluster of christological images: (1) Jesus as Life-giver, with special reference to the images of healer and traditional healer, (2) Jesus as Mediator, developing the image of Jesus as ancestor, (3) Jesus as Leader, focusing on the images of king / chief and liberator, and (4) Jesus as Loved One. Only the first three categories are presented within the confines of this thesis, while the fourth—Jesus as Loved One—is referred to briefly in relation to overlapping themes. Analysis elucidates the rationale, sources, methods, and meaning of emergent African christologies. Research findings indicate that the selected African Christians reveal confident, contextual engagement with the fundamental question of Jesus, "Who do you say that I am?" (Mark 8:29). That is, responses to this question are formulated not only in light of biblical revelation and Christian tradition, but also in terms of African realities both past and present. These contemporary African christologies thus represent an important landmark in the development of African theology. Their significance to the ongoing shaping of Christian tradition is noted in view of Africa's prominent place in world Christianity at the turn of the third millennium, with implications for christological reflection and praxis.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleJesus of Africa: voices of Contemporary African Christology from selected textual and oral sourcesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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