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dc.contributor.authorTrentham, Charlesen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:49:12Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:49:12Z
dc.date.issued1952en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30853
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractDuring the period when the eighteenth century was merging into the nineteenth, William Paley was regarded as the outstanding apologist of the Christian religion in England. So conclusive was his work considered to be that one reviewer could write the following:en
dc.description.abstractWe regard Dr. Paley's writings on the "Evidences of Christianity" as of so signally decisive a character that we could be content to let them stand as the essence, and the close of the great argument, on the part of its believers; and should feel no despondency or chagrin, if we could be prophetically certain that such an efficient Christian reasoner would never henceforward arise.en
dc.description.abstractThe above was written in the year 1809. Since then Paley has been largely forgotten. The average student knows about him only this: that he was called "Pigeon" Paley and that he used some sort of analogy about a watch. To the writer it appeared that a rediscovery of Paley might offer to the modern reader some values that were greatly admired in the eighteenth century.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe ethics of William Paleyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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