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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Harold Earle.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:49:31Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:49:31Z
dc.date.issued1952en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30883
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIt is popularly supposed that the Society of Friends does not have a ministry. That is a misconception which this thesis seeks to correct. Ministry has had an important place in the Quaker Movement from its origin to the present. The Quaker conception of a ministry and its development is discussed in the historical context of the Movement's life and activity during the past three hundred years. it.en
dc.description.abstractThe Quaker Movement began with the preaching of George Fox whose gift in the ministry was faithfully and continuously employed in the proclamation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. His spiritual enthusiasm was sc- contagious that in a short time he had a company of over sixty ministers who joined him in a preaching mission of such magnitude and power that within ten years some forty thousand people in England were in the Quaker Fellowship. The transformation in the lives of these people and in the changed character of their communities witnessed to the presence of the Holy Spirit in their midst. The blessing of God attended this preaching mission in such a way that the ministers considered themselves to be in the vanguard of a recovery of essential Christianity.en
dc.description.abstractFrom this beginning in the middle of the seventeenth century, Friends have continued' to emphasize the importance of a vital spiritual ministry in the life of the Christian community. their concept of the ministry is non-episcopal which puts them in the Free Church tradition. But they have gone beyond the other groups in that tradition by giving the fullest practical application to the doctrine of the priesthood of all believers. "Of all conceptions of ministry," writes Miss Smith, "the simplest and most comprehensive is to be found in the Society of Friends.en
dc.description.abstractThe fundamental principles in the Quaker conception of a ministry are held by all groups of Friends and they have been present throughout their history. First, there is the conviction that the Head of the Church bestows the gift of ministry upon certain members who are called to service in the same by the Holy Spirit. "This ministry is not limited to any specially ordained class, but the divine call may be to man or woman, learned or unlearned, old or young." Secondly, when such a call to ministry comes there should be no quenching of the Spirit, but a glad obedience ana dedication of life in this vocation. Thirdly, such a gift in the ministry must be exercised in continual dependence upon the Holy Spirit if it is to fulfill its mission of service to God end man. Such a ministry will be accompanied by 'the signs of the Apostle'.en
dc.description.abstractThe fundamental principles in the Quaker conception of a ministry are held by all groups of Friends and they have been present throughout their history. First, there is the conviction that the Head of the Church bestows the gift of ministry upon certain members who are called to service in the same by the Holy Spirit. "This ministry is not limited to any specially ordained class, but the divine call may be to man or woman, learned or unlearned, old or young." Secondly, when such a call to ministry comes there should be no quenching of the Spirit, but a glad obedience ana dedication of life in this vocation. Thirdly, such a gift in the ministry must be exercised in continual dependence upon the Holy Spirit if it is to fulfill its mission of service to God end man. Such a ministry will be accompanied by 'the signs of the Apostle'.en
dc.description.abstractIn addition to these fundamentals in their conception of a ministry, there are two principles on which Quakers have differed in the last century. First, there is the practice of acknowledgement by the Church of a gift in the ministry received by one of its members. Such recognition was an accepted principle by ell Quaker groups until 1924 when London Yearly Meeting discontinued the practice of recording ministers. This group of Friends continues to uphold the fundamental principles given above and affirms that the work of the ministry has an essential place in the service of the Kingdom of God. But London Yearly Meeting no longer acknowledges the gift and service of ministry with a formal act of record. This is in contrast to the practice of most Friends throughout the world. Secondly, the principle of a settled ministry, or the pastorate, has been adopted by a majority of Friends. This development in American Quakerism during the latter half of the nineteenth century has brought an important addition to the conception of a ministry as held by Friends. There are some who might not grant the conception of a ministry in the Quaker Movement without this later development. This study has indicated that there has been a conception of the ministry present in Quakerism from the very beginning and that this conception has validity.dc.de
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleThe conception of a ministry in the Quaker Movement and a survey of its developmenten
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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