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dc.contributor.authorCouper, Mary Morrisonen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T12:50:51Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T12:50:51Z
dc.date.issued1936en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/30972
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIn Spain the term 'comedia' corresponded to 'play' in our own English drama and ' Schauspiel' in the German theatre. The 'Siglo de Oro' permitted a fusion of genres, and the 'comedia' designated a fusion of tragic and comic elements, which the majority of other(1) theatres have kept separate. A Spanish piece therefore might be emotional and tragic in parta and yet remain a 'comedia'. In one of his works Morel -Patio has given the following definition of the Spanish 'Comedia':(2) "C'est un terme "très large qui embrasse tous les genres de drame, que les "effets en soient comiques ou tragiques, a l'exclusion "d'une part, d'un certain drame religieux ou liturgique "que les Espagnols nomment auto, et d'autre part, des "genres inférieurs, de la farce, de l'interwede, du vaudeville, des pieces de circonstance, des féeries mythologiques . " Lope de Vega, who perfected the 'Siglo de Oro comedia', had a definite theory about the fusion of genres. He stated that this type of dramatic production was the mirror of life, and, as comedy and tragedy were inseparable in the lives of men, so they must appear side by side in the Spanish 'comedia', which was the reflection of reality. He recommended to playwrights "Lo trágico y lo cómico mezclado",(1) and, developing this idea, he gave them further advice:en
dc.description.abstract"Hayan grave una parte, otra ridícula; "Que orquesta variedad deleita mucho. "Buen ejemplo nos da naturaleza, "Que por tal variedad tiene belleza. "(2)en
dc.description.abstractEnglish Elizabethan drama exemplified this theory also; Shakespeare delighted in mingling the tragic with the comic element.en
dc.description.abstractThe works of the national Spanish theatre dealt with neither philosophy nor abstract theories but primarily with human beings. The never -ending passion and interest of the Spanish audience was in the individual, struggling, hating, loving, suffering, dying - in short, the complete man. He was often represented as a little better or worse than he really was, and the interpretation of his character became highly conventionalised in most Spanish Dramatic works. Yet the 'comedia' was born of direct contact with humanity, and man remained the centre of interest.en
dc.description.abstractThe first essential of a successful Spanish 'comedia' was a good story with thrilling intrigue and abundant action. The plot had to be complicated and skilfully developed. The members of a Spanish audience demanded from their theatre entertainment before all else. They had little desire to listen to preaching or moralising; they mainly asked to be amused. The analysis of character interested them little. The subtle psychological works of many modern Spanish playwrights would have made little appeal to a 'Siglo de Oro' audience. A national background was preferred for the 'comedia', in which were to be found certain elements inherent in the national consciousness. Therefore the same subjects, for example, patriotism, religion, 'pundonor', appeared and reappeared persistently in Spanish 'Comedias': subjects which made particular appeal to the people of Spain but were not of great interest to the peoples of other European nations.en
dc.description.abstractWhen considering the strength of Spain's dramatic production, we must not forget that Spanish genius seemed to possess gifts and qualities eminently suited to the writing of plays. First of these qualities was realism, without which the theatre could never have reached such heights. This power of observation and truthful reproduction made of the drama a real thing which appealed to and held its audience. Warm, living, Spanish realism laid the foundation of the success of the national 'come - dia'. Along with this realism there was a sense of the theatre, which was possessed by most Spanish dramatists. They excelled in creating situations and unravelling plots, while many of them showed remarkable perfection of technique. Nor did they lack creative power, imagination, and a certain spontaneous passion necessary for the achievement of any really great work. This national Spanish 'comedia' was more a product of intuition than of studied thought. It was a vital, spontaneous thing which throbbed and pulsated with the life of a nation.en
dc.description.abstractSpanish 'comedia' of the 'Siglo de Oro' was indebted hardly at all to the ancient Greek and Roman drama or to the contemporary French classical drama. Lope de Vega admitted that he was acquainted with the rule of the Three Unities and with the precepts for the correct writing of plays; but he confessed that in practice he ignored these theories.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2018 Block 19en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe evolution of the Spanish 'comedia' from the close of the seventeenth century to the present day: with special reference to the period 1835-1898en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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