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dc.contributor.advisorOzga, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorHowieson, Cathy
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-03T16:04:21Z
dc.date.available2010-03-03T16:04:21Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/3308
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is concerned with the organisation of education and training systems and the extent to which their design may challenge or reinforce social inequalities. In modern societies, people’s life chances are inextricably linked to the education they are able to access and the knowledge and skills (typically manifested through formal qualifications) they acquire, thus how countries organise their education and training systems is of fundamental importance in determining the opportunities available to its citizens and to their life chances. The specific focus of the thesis is on the design and organisation of post compulsory education and training systems - a stage that represents a particular challenge for policy-makers - and within that, on how systems might conceptualise academic and vocational learning in more productive ways. Education systems are not context-free structures: the design of a nation’s education and training system provides a window onto its traditions, its social values and economic stance, and its current preoccupations and ambitions for itself. Thus the thesis uses the example of the Higher Still reform of post compulsory education and training in Scotland (from 1999 onwards) to reflect more generally on education and social inequalities in Scotland and to ask how we should understand the way in which Scotland has approached reform of its education and training provision. It seeks to explicate the reasons for the adoption of the Higher Still reform strategy, to identify the factors that determined its specific design and development and to reflect on how the particular reform strategy embodied by Higher Still relates to certain aspects of the Scottish context and its policy processes. The thesis then examines the institutional response to Higher Still and its impact on the opportunities available to young people. It locates the Higher Still example within the broader field of education policy, considering what the experience of the Higher Still reform reveals about the possibilities of re-designing an education and training system in ways which promote social equality and the scope for manoeuvre that policy-makers, in a specific national context, have in relation to system reform.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionHowieson, C., Raffe, D., Spours, K., and Young, M. (1997) Unifying Academic and Vocational Learning: The State of the Debate in England and Scotland, Journal of Education and Work, 10(1), pp.5-35.en
dc.relation.hasversionRaffe, D., Howieson, C., Spours, K., and Young, M. (1998) ‘The Unification of Post-Compulsory Education: Towards a Conceptual Framework’, British Journal of Educational Studies, 46(2), June, pp.169-187.en
dc.relation.hasversionRaffe, D., and Howieson, C. (1998) The Higher Still Policy Process, Scottish Affairs, 24, Summer 1998, pp.90-108.en
dc.relation.hasversionRaffe, D., Howieson, C., Spours,K. and Young, M (1999) ‘Issues in a ‘home international’ comparison of policy strategies: the experience of the Unified Learning Project’, in F.Coffield (ed) Why’s the Beer always Stronger up North? Studies of lifelong learning in Europe, ESRC Learning Society Series 2, Policy Press.en
dc.relation.hasversionHowieson, C. Raffe, D. and Tinklin, T. (2001) Institutional Responses to a Flexible Unified System: The Case of Scottish Colleges of Further Education, in Nijhof et al (eds) Conditions for Flexible Vocational Education and Training, Amsterdam: Kluwer, pp.67-84.en
dc.relation.hasversionHowieson, C. Raffe,D., and Tinklin,T. (2004) The Use of New National Qualifications in S3 and S4 in 2002-03, Scottish Educational Review, 36(2), Nov 2004.en
dc.relation.hasversionHowieson, C. and Closs, A. (2006) Finally Included? The Evolution of Curricular Access for Students with Learning Difficulties, Scottish Educational Review, 38(1), May 2006.en
dc.relation.hasversionHowieson, C. and Iannelli, C. (2007) The Effects of Low Attainment on Young People’s Outcomes at age 22-23. British Educational Research Journalen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEducation Policyen
dc.titleReforming designs: education and training in Scotland and Higher Stillen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD(P) Doctor of Philosophy by Research Publicationsen


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