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dc.contributor.authorNarayanaswamy, B. V.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:14:51Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:14:51Z
dc.date.issued1929
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/33372
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractWe have seen in the first chapter, the general conditions existing in India and in particular the miserable condition of Industrial workers, and it was also shown how India is slowly becoming an Industrial country. In the third and last chapter, we discussed the low standard of life of the Industrial worker and showed how, especially after the war there were constant troubles especially over the demand for advances in wages. It has also been shown that the majority of workers of India are illiteí''ate and semi -agriculturist, and it was pointed out how necessary it is to dispel the mass of ignorance how better wages would enable them to settle permanently in industrial towns. It would be impossible to make them efficient or to increase production, :.o the present low standard of living. It is most important that operatives in India should start organisations on the lines of the Trade Unions of the VIest, not only for presenting a solid front to their employers but for the mutual relief and the common good of their own class. The State, the employers and public- spirited citizens must come forward to assist in the amelioration of their condition. The State can best play a part by introducing compulsory education, which would solve many of the difficulties which we pointed out on account of employing illiterate workers in the industries. Government, central and local should also encourage the building of decent dwelling houses for the working classes. If real efforts were made in these directions, the workers would become more efficient than they are at present. Special manual training and technical education will also act favourably on the economic development of the country. Co-operative Societies should be encouraged so that Indian workers may get cheap and wholesome foodstuffs and the Government should .-raduel ly introduce protective measures to safe -guard the interests of the workers. Factory inspection, rigidly enforcing satisfactory sanitary conditions both in the factories, and in the localities where workers dwell should be introduced. Such ameloriative measures will react very beneficially and will tend to ease the present industrial unrest and thus in- :directly minimise industrial disputes. To my mind, such small concessions will-confer great benefit because the workers can be easily placated. It is much more easy to please Indian workers than workers elsewhere for by nature and upbringing generally makes him be grateful for the little he gets. There is no doubt, that a special responsibility lies upon the employers, who must see that their workers find conditions of work reasonably congenial to them and that they are as: efficient as they can be. The inefficiency of Indian labour is a serious factor which leads to many unhappy results. Employers should realise that efficient labour conduces to increase production and that industries will prosper better and people will be happier in proportion to the degree of the efficiency of labour. As such they should make every attempt to improve their position. The employers should make it a point to start welfare schemes and social service Leagues in every factory. On humanitarian grounds, at least, they should institute free medical aid and sick benefit funds to which the employers should subscribe liberally. There are some such schemes in many places but they should be made general rather than the exception. The employers should also introduce provident and pension funds. Every ameliorative measure should be. adopted to raise the workers from their present bad state and if necessary the Government should make these obligatory.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleTrade disputes in Great Britain: a brief enquiry into causes of, and an examination of methods of dealing with these, and particularly the experience and possibilities of conciliation and arbitration; and with a reference to Indian labouren
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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