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dc.contributor.authorRae, A. M. Wilsonen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:17:28Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:17:28Z
dc.date.issued1929
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/33605
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractCentral Africa presents the biggest leprosy problem which the Empire has to face and must face. The extent of the disease is not yet realised nor will it be so until thorough and systematic search be made in the villages in all the colonies. A superficial count is so inaccurate and misleading as to be absolutely dangerous. Vast improvement in treatment has been made in the last decade and if full advantage of this be taken the final stamping out of leprosy is only a matter of time. Supplies of the seeds of Hydnocarpus Wightiana can now be readily procured and grow well in these tropical possessions. In five years after planting,an adequate supply of the drug would exist locally. The contagiousness of leprosy is not m,Ftter of conjecture, but of fact, and if this be realised, then a proper combating of the scourge is only possible if some form of segregation be used. Compulsory segregation at present would do no good but rather infinite harm. Segregation must be undertaken voluntarily by the natives, commencing firstly with villages and then with groups of villages. The natives would consent to do this, as they do realise the danger of the disease and understand its spread.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleLeprosy: with special reference to its occurrence in the Protectorate of Gambiaen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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