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dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Kenneth A.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:18:56Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:18:56Z
dc.date.issued1958
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/33735
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe conclusions of the results obtained in this study are such that no method of computing vertical velocity here tried inspires any real confidence, when applied under realistic'field' conditions as they now exist in N.W.Europe i.e. radio-sonde ascents at a time interval of 12 hours (though on a moderately close network), and upper -air winds at 6-hour intervals and to the nearest ten degrees of arc.en
dc.description.abstractThe study indicates that some at least of the methods based on the adiabatic assumption probably yield vertical motion patterns of reasonable , accuracy over restricted areas and at higher levels. Trial of kinematic and dynamic methods produced extremely erratic results in terms of what appeared to be the physical reality of the test situation. The results of the calculation of probable errors of computed values or of independent trials in a given situation are such as to hold out little hope of the successful application of these methods in the present 'field' conditions described. In addition, basic difficulties related to the scale of the movement involved in the study arose with both these methods.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleA study of large scale vertical motion in the atmosphereen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen


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