Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSimson, Alexander MacDonalden
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:21:58Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:21:58Z
dc.date.issued1936
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/33961
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractAt 3 a.m. on the 31st May 1935, the native quarter of Quetta city was destroyed by an earthquake of terrific violence. Out of a reputed population of 50,000 it is estimated at least 30,000 perished in their houses. The Military Garrison of 20,000 largely escaped with the exception of the Royal Air Force Units who suffered severely through being lodged close to the vortex of the disturbance. The Indian Police also suffered heavily losing 172 of their strength, a loss which must have disorganized completely a force whose services were to be so urgently required in restoring law and order. It is not proposed further to describe the earthquake except in so far as it has some relation to the subject of this Thesis. The fact that epidemic diseases did not at once break out at the scene of the disaster has already been commented on in various published descriptions of condj.tions following the upheaval. It is proposed to describe the outbreak of Oriental sore at Quetta which prevailed amongst Troops and Civilians during the early months of 1936, and to compare and contrast this epidemic with similar happenings in other places under varying circumstances.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleOriental sore: some observations suggested by its prevalence in Quetta in 1936en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record