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dc.contributor.authorTaileb, Alien
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:24:02Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:24:02Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34160
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractIn the past thirty years, cities have grown at a phenomenal rate. This abnormal growth is mainly caused by urban expansion that overwhelms the balance between natural resources and the morphological characteristics of each region. Today typical sprawling housing developments, shopping centres, highways and other developments emerged from design principles that did not originate from any sense of the environmental context or to humankind's relation to it. Many problems caused by urban growth, such as pollution, energy, segregation, sprawl and lack of social and cultural consideration have become unsustainable to the urban environment. There are many publications that examine sustainability from an objective (physical) point of view, mainly as a set of problems to be resolved through advanced technology and progressive innovations. The author believes that there are many other aspects as important as the objective aspects in terms of people's subjective preferences, as attitudes and cultural aspects could contribute to sustaining the environment. Sustainability is approached in this thesis from subjective and cultural aspects which include values shared by collective minds. The hypothesis of the research is achieved through people's perception of the built environment as a tool to understanding the man- environment relationship. The significance of involving people, their perceptions, needs and preferences from a more genuine point of view is trying to explore and understand in depth the hidden forces and values of things that maintain a sustainable system from the point of view of people. The study examines people's perception and satisfaction in two settings Edinburgh and Ottawa. The orientation of this research is exploratory and relies on qualitative and quantitative research. Deductive inference explores in depth theoretical issues on the topic and analyses the principle of maintaining a sustainable urban environment by addressing the issue from the literature and the case studies. Inductive inference is adopted to maintain habitual notions and established values of the field survey by analysis of the collected data. The theoretical approach adopted in this research is that of transactional, cognition and perception. This combined approach assumes inseparability of context and considers people as a holistic entity. The outcomes of this research identify major areas of contribution which relate to the discourse of sustainable urban systems. A contrast was evident in connection with land use, mixed uses and transport in the cases of Edinburgh and Ottawa, the former city being characterised by a more dense form than the latter's low- density, sprawling form. A strong appreciation between home -work relationships was evaluated in both samples. This research highlights the impact of subjective considerations on how peoples' maintain a sustainable urban environment.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleSustaining urban systems and people's perception: with reference study to Edinburgh and Ottawaen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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