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dc.contributor.authorIrvine, W. J.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:30:50Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:30:50Z
dc.date.issued1956
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34747
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe last decade has witnessed an unprecedented development in the therapy of infectious diseases and a significant change in the practice of medicine. The variety of antibiotic substances discovered and made freely available during this short space of time permitted the ready control of many microbial infections and thus prevented many deaths. The developments were exceedingly rapid. As one drug speedily followed another, pressure from the public, industry and physicians continuously urged the achievement of practical objectives. As a result, fundamental investigations of the properties and behaviour of these antimicrobial substances lagged far behind their widespread clinical use.en
dc.description.abstractIt was fortuitous (and possibly unfortunate) that the first of the antibiotics to become widely used, penicillin, possessed characteristics closely approaching that of an ideal chemotherapeutic agent; virtual lack of toxicity for the host; satisfactory absorption, distribution and action in the host tissues and fluids; highly lethal action against susceptible parasites; and, in particular, only very limited development of bacterial resistance. Physicians soon developed the habit of administering penicillin quite indiscriminately because "it might help and could do no harm." As other antibiotics became available this same attitude was applied. Unfortunately, the "newer" antibiotics were not as close to the chemotherapeutic ideal as was penicillin and their widespread use and abuse were followed by a surge of reports on treatment failure due to drug toxicity and the development of bacterial resistance. In this essay an attempt has.been made to review the present a state of knowledge concerning the fundamental properties of the sulphonamides and antibiotics and the manner whereby bacteria can acquire resistance to their action. It is only by such a rational approach to the problem that measures which will be permanently effective in counteracting bacterial resistance will be achieved. So far the supply of new antibiotics has in most instances more than matched the capacity of bacteria to resist them, but if this supply should cease - and presumably the number yet to be discovered is limited - the time may come when a few of the more enterprising bacterial species will flourish more or less unhindered.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleBacterial resistane to chemotherapyen
dc.title.alternativeBacterial resistane to chemotherapy: submitted for the Lewis Cameron Undergraduate Prize in Bacteriology, 1956en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePrize Essayen


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