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dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Hablot John Moxonen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:32:29Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:32:29Z
dc.date.issued1907
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34897
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractModern medical science,aided by all the latest discoveries,and assisted by well equipped laboratories,has been spreading its tentacles over the wide world and grappled with the problems of disease of all races and of all climes.Schools of tropical medicine are rapidly becoming established,and,under their auspices, expeditions have been formed to endeavour to cope with and,if possible,destroy the causes of maiaria, sleeping sickness,yellow fever,and other diseases imperfectly understood at present,and likely to be so until our knowledge concerning their protean manifestations has been advanced by prospective research.Their beneficial results are known to all,and their achievements duly applauded but meanwhile there still remain, even at home, widespread diseases whose names are commonplace expressions,which take their toll of infant lives, year by year; so that,until some vigorous crusade is started throughout the land,when people awake to the significance of the wastage of infant life, and the deformity and physical enfeeblement of the children, these modern evils are likely to remain in our midst. Many great problems are to be faced in our own country;and the greatest of them all is the terrible mortality among infants,under one year of age,that goes on,year by year,unchecked and undiminished by the improved conditions of living introduced by science and preventive medicine.The adult death-rate has been reduced by modern medicine and hygiene;but they appear to have in no way affected the rate of infantile mortality. We are face to face with the fact that,although the general death-rate is decreasing, the infantile mortality is not declining (Newman, - Infantile Mortality). In 1905, the death-rate of infants in England and Wales was 120,000,which equalled one-quarter of all the deaths in that year.This about equals the population of Birkenhead. Imagine this town,wiped out by disaster,or deceminated by a widespread epidemic causing 120,000 deaths; in other words,concentrate this loss of life, and immediately public feeling would be aroused,the press would be stirred, every effort would be made to discover the cause,and steps would be taken to avert, if possible, a similar calamity in the future! Yet, because this loss of life is spread over a wide area of space and time, it has been allowed to go on for fifty years, sapping the nation's newborn strength and depriving it of a population which would be useful to it in future generations. In all tranches of science and medicine the last half-century can point to wonderful achievements :yet, when we read that the infantile mortality is almost stationary,surely a feeling almost akin to shame must sweep over us! In the course of this thesis it is proposed to inquire, on these broad lines, into the etiology of rickets, and also to discuss the best means to be adopted to prevent and treat the disease.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleRickets: illustrated by numerous cases and some special photographsen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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