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dc.contributor.authorKozlowski, Jerzyen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:32:44Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:32:44Z
dc.date.issued1971en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34918
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe main subject of this research thesis concerns in general the interrelations between rationalisation and quantification in the urban planning approach, exposed mainly by critical evaluation and development of one particular quantitative method known as threshold analysis. Part 1 of the thesis explains the theoretical background of this analysis developed on the basis of threshold theory. Threshold theory, developed in Poland by B. Malisz in 1963, states from observation that towns encounter physical limitations to their expansion which have been called DEVELOPMENT THRESHOLDS. They are not irremediable but can be overcome only at 'additional' cost, i.e. at THRESHOLD COSTS which must either be spent before the land is opened up for development, or which have to be spread over the period of time. Threshold analysis in turn allows (i) the identification of thresholds as lines on maps and/or as points on development curves, and (ii) the calculation of costs necessary for their overstepping. It therefore creates a framework for comparison of the 'effectiveness' of development variants and points out where and how thresholds could be met so that saving of inputs for expansion can be maximised. The scope of application of threshold analysis ranges from analysing and comparing urban development possibilities of a single town to its indirect use in regional planning by providing important parameters deriving from threshold analysis of all towns within the region concerned. The recently discovered possibility of direct application of the threshold concept to regional analyses by analysing 'thresholds' in exploitation or expansion of regional resources upon which any development of economic activities depends is also discussed and presented in more detail. Part 2 of the thesis concentrates on evaluation of threshold analysis in urban planning by presenting and assessing results achieved in its application in Poland and by testing the method in the two Scottish subregional plans, for Grangemouth/Falkirk and the Central Borders. Similar investigations follow in the field of direct application of threshold analysis to regional analyses. This approach was tested first by B. Malisz in Yugoslavia and then within the Planning Research Unit, Edinburgh University, in the study dealing with angling potential in Ireland. Part 2 results in a comprehensive and critical assessment of the validity of threshold analysis with all its advantages and disadvantages clearly exposed. This finally leads to outlining the implications for further research necessary if the latent potential of threshold analysis is to be fully exploited in planning practice. Part 3 of the thesis, following the criticism of existing forms of threshold analysis, attempts to take the previously indicated guidelines in order to improve and refine the whole threshold approach. Firstly, steps are taken to remove a great deal of confusion about the nature of thresholds, by developing definitions which in a 'neutral' mathematical way describebasic notions of threshold analysis, and by offering a framework for classifying thresholds in an unequivocal way. S econdly, the simple form of threshold analysis is developed into a comprehensive 'model' process allowing for the introduction into the course of the analysis of all factors (such as the impact of frozen assets, exploitation costs, etc.) so far missing, while maintaining its basic simplicity to warrant its applicability in everyday planning practice. Thirdly, the contribution of threshold analysis is considered within the context of the overall planning process, the model of which is proposed both in a simplified and an expanded version. The role of threshold analysis in its framework is then discussed with particular emphasis attached to the concept of integrating it with other complementary techniques (Optimisation Method, Planning Balance Sheet, and Goals-Achievement Matrix) which may greatly help in general rationalisation of the urban planning approach. The conclusions from the research are thus greatly inherent in Part 3, but the major points deriving are summarised at the end, culminating in the final statement that threshold analysis is not a complete theory of planning. It embodies only some parameters for the development of urban strategy and it does not measure the benefits of alternative urban forms. It does indicate, however, the cost of these forms and helps to identify the factors causing variations in these costs. In general it does not replace other judgments but puts them on a more objective foundation.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThreshold analysis: theoretical background, evaluation and developmenten
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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