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dc.contributor.authorLangley, Jabez Ayodeleen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:33:00Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:33:00Z
dc.date.issued1968en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34940
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis study, as the title indicates, is concerned with the West African aspects of the Pan-African movements of the 1920s and I940s. It is not, however, strictly confined to West Africa; it aims to see the subject under review in its widest context and within the complicated network of ideas which characterised early Pan-Africanism. The aim is to study the subject both in depth and in breadth. Accordingly, the study is divided into three parts. Part I, which consists of chapters I and II gives a fairly detailed historical background'as well as incorporating new material. It covers the period from the Abolition era in America to the end of the 1920s and the demise of the Du Boisian Pan-African congresses. Part II consists of chapters III, IV^ V and VI, and is a detailed study of an early pan-West African nationalist body - the National Congress of British West Africa. . The period covered extends from 1918 to the end of the 30*s. Apart from a few cases, the bulk of the material used in these chapters is entirely new; use has been made of private papers and unpublished manuscripts and documents to throw more light on certain questions relating to the N.C.B.W.A. and to West African attitudes to transatlantic Pan-Negroism. Part III comprises chapters VII, VIII and IX. Chapter VII seems unusual in this type of study which generally assumes the nonparticipation of French-speaking Negroes (in our case, French-speaking West Africans) in the early history of Pan-Africanism. Chapter VII deals in some detail with the Pan-Negro thought and politics ofFrench Africans during the period 1921+-1936, and its inclusion is perhaps a much needed departure from the standard histories of Pan-Africanism. Chapters VIII and IX cover a fairly well known phase of the Pan-African movement but the focus is mostly on West Africa. The themes dealt with include the political impact of the Italo-Ethiopian crises, the emergence of a new group of Pan-African radicals both in London and in West Africa, and the evolution of Kwame Nkrumah's ideas on political unification. Rare journals and the Sekyi papers have been used in an attempt to reconstruct and explain Nkrumah's early political views and attitudes.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyAlready catalogueden
dc.titleWest African aspects of the Pan-African movements: 1900-1945en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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