Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLangstaff, Mariclaireen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:33:01Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:33:01Z
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34942
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a study of Irish immigrants in Yorkshire and Lancashire in the period 1815 to 1845. It examines the experience of these migrants in order to discover who they were, where they came from, to what extent their pre-migration experience was reflected in their lives in their new homes and whether or not they possessed an awareness of themselves as a community. Research has involved extensive use of convict transportation and court records, local newspapers, colonial and home office records and folklore material.en
dc.description.abstractDocumentary evidence on the Irish diaspora for the first half of the nineteenth-century is scarce and as a result historical literature tends to focus on the second half of the century. As a consequence of the limited availability of historical evidence, the literature which does exist for the earlier period has relied too heavily on conclusions reached about Famine migrants and on negative images with less specific origins. This thesis uses records of transportation which provide full and reliable data on age, birthplace, occupations, marital and family status, literacy and religion, to provide a new and vivid profile of the Irish in Britain. The conclusions drawn from this data challenge many previous assumptions and are presented in Chapter One.en
dc.description.abstractChapters Two and Three consider the way in which the Irish saw themselves and were seen by the English. The existing literature concentrates almost exclusively on English attitudes towards the Irish, thus confirming the strength of the anti-Irish stereotype in denying the Irish their prejudices. It is argued here that identities are mutually constituting and that both parties played an important creative role in the self image of the other. Relations between Irish immigrants and their English hosts could not but be affected by their long history of opposition and mutual misrepresentation.en
dc.description.abstractChapters Four to Six focus on the ways in which Irish identity manifested itself in Yorkshire and Lancashire, that is, in politics, in their secret societies and in religion. Chapter Four demonstrates the commitment of large numbers of Irish immigrants to the interests of their native home and the way in which they remained under the influence of political leaders such as Daniel O'Connell. Chapter Five shows the way in which the introduction of Ribbon Societies to Britain helped to maintain and reinforce ethnic identity. Finally Chapter Six argues that the Irish, far from being indifferent to matters of religion, had very particular ideas regarding the organisation of their Church and were adept at asserting their opinions.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleIrish migrant identity in Yorkshire and Lancashire, 1815-1845en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record