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dc.contributor.authorBurns, Robert E.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:33:34Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:33:34Z
dc.date.issued1915
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/34985
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractit will no doubt be apparent to the reader that the period 1814 - 1867 was one of exceeding importance in the development of anatomical knowledge. It is remarkable in that during this time the knowledge gained was of a particularly definite and accurate nature, from which fact this era must be regarded as epochal. The researches in microscopic anatomy were largely responsible for the wonderful strides made in the study of physiology, and so closely are many of the anatomical discoveries of the day, related to the subject of physiology,that it is somewhat difficult to differentiate - to determine where the one ends and the other begins. However every effort has been made to avoid the lure of a discussion of the latter aspect and if such men as Bernard, Pasteur, Bell and Magendie have not been discussed as fully as we would like it is because their work, though anatomical in certain respects, was largely of a physiological nature. Only those of their great discoveries bearing more directly on our subject have been presented. As mentioned previously, certain skilled anatomists of the period, though they made no first -hand discoveries of note, were responsible for great advances in the art of surgery. These we have been reluctantly compelled to pass over, though the fact that they existed and that their art flourished must not be lost sight of in considering the history of anatomy during the years under review.en
dc.description.abstractWe shall not endeavour to estimate the relative merits of the various men and nations engaged in the great advance made, for it appears to us that where science is concerned distinctions are invidious and that in the compilation of a history criticism and estimations are unwarranted.en
dc.description.abstractFrom a certain more or less remote period in which we read in Virgil that "Dido nursed the wound within her veins" we have wondered how much anatomy the ancients really knew, and in what manner anatomical knowledge developed through the ages. The research entailed in the writing of these pages has done much to clear the atmosphere in this respect and to lead us to a full appreciation of the wonderful work done in the development of anatomical knowledge during the epoch - making years of the life -time of John Goodsir.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe development of anatomical study during the lifetime of John Goodsir (1814-1867)en
dc.title.alternativeThe development of anatomical study during the lifetime of John Goodsir (1814-1867): submitted for the Wellcome Prize in the History of Medicineen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePrize Essayen


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